7 Powerful Tips to Help Overcome Your Fear of Public Speaking

Do you get nervous at the thought of public speaking? It’s one of the most common fears globally, and for a good reason. Your voice could crack, you might forget your lines, or you could have an anxiety attack on stage. But what if we told you that there are ways to overcome your fear of public speaking? It’s not easy, but with a bit of practice and these seven powerful tips, you’ll be well on your way to giving speeches that leave your audience in awe.

Unfortunately, there are many occasions where we are bound for delivering a speech. Whether it’s a business presentation, community event, or just a family gathering, there will always be times when you have to stand up and speak, so you might as well sharpen your speaking skills!

Learning to speak in front of a group is very beneficial. Conquering that fear of public speaking could mean a raise at work, a more prominent role as a community leader, or more fulfilling relationships.

Understand why you’re afraid

One of the first steps in overcoming any fear is understanding why you’re afraid in the first place. For most people, the fear of public speaking comes from a fear of judgment. You’re worried that you’ll say something stupid, that you’ll look like a fool or that you won’t be able to answer questions. What’s more, this fear can often lead to a fear of failure. You’re so worried about embarrassing yourself that you start to worry about every little detail leading up to your presentation. This can lead to a lot of anxiety and stress. But, by understanding why you’re afraid, you can start to address those fears head-on.

Develop a game plan

Develop a game plan. The best way to overcome your fear of public speaking is to have a plan. And I’m not talking about a plan to avoid public speaking (although that can be part of it). I’m talking about a plan to help you succeed when you do speak publicly. Know what you’re going to say-practice, practice, practice. And, most importantly, know your audience. What do they want to hear? What are their concerns? Tailor your talk to meet their needs, and you’ll have them on your side from the start.

Don’t expect perfection.

It’s important not to set unrealistic expectations for your speech. Chances are your audience doesn’t expect perfection either. They understand that everyone makes mistakes, and they may be terrified of public speaking themselves! You might skip over a part of your talk or stutter a little, and these are all common human mistakes.

Get organized

One of the best ways to reduce your stress and feel more in control is to get organized. Plan out what you’re going to say and make sure you know your points inside and out. That way, you won’t have to worry about forgetting something or rushing through your presentation. Being prepared will also help you feel more confident when speaking in front of a crowd.

Take baby steps

Just because you’re scared of public speaking doesn’t mean you can’t do it. Fear is often what stops people from even trying. But with a few simple baby steps, you can start to overcome your fear and build up your confidence. First, start by accepting that you’re scared. Acknowledge that public speaking isn’t always easy for everyone. It’s okay to be afraid. Then, focus on the positives and what you can gain from public speaking.

Think about the opportunities it can bring, such as networking and expanding your professional reach. Once you’ve gotten yourself in the right mindset, start practising. Take on more minor challenges at first and gradually work your way up. Remember, Rome wasn’t built in a day! Finally, don’t be too hard on yourself. Everyone makes mistakes-the key is to learn from them and move on.

Try to have a backup plan.

It’s always a good idea to have a backup plan in life, and public speaking is no exception. Think about what you might want to say if you get stuck. If your mind goes blank, take a deep breath and start your backup plan. You’ll most likely be back on track before you know it.

Seek professional help

Although professional help may seem like a daunting task, it can be beneficial to seek out a speech therapist or public speaking coach. These experts can help you develop techniques to overcome your fear of public speaking. They can also provide support and guidance as you work to improve your communication skills. Remember, you’re not alone in this journey-there are plenty of people who want to help you succeed.

The Audience

Most of the time, the audience is the reason you’re terrified to give your speech, but knowing that they’re on your side helps a lot. Keep a positive attitude because the chances are good that the audience wants you to succeed in your speech.

Remember that even if you do mess up, it’s not the end of the world. As long as you’ve prepared yourself well enough and have a backup plan in place, you’ll be able to pick yourself back up if you trip up anywhere in your speech.

It’s essential to take notes and assess yourself after your presentation. Make a list of your observations on what you did well, as well as opportunities for improvement.

Fear of public speaking is one of the most common fears in the world. But it doesn’t have to control your life. With a little effort, you can overcome your fear and start speaking with confidence. As you practice your public speaking skills, you’ll get better and more comfortable in time. Just keep at it!

Originally published at https://www.momentsofpositivity.com on March 18, 2022.

--

--

--

Love podcasts or audiobooks? Learn on the go with our new app.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Moments Of Positivity

Moments Of Positivity

Blogger

More from Medium

10 things I learned transitioning from higher education to tech

What an improved reading routine has taught me in 2021

How to Get Your Audience’s Attention and Interest. Make Them Uncomfortable

Who’s After You? (Five strategies for developing future leaders)